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Best Friends Veterinary Center
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Informed Consent

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INFORMED CONSENT, INVOICE & ESTIMATE NOTES

All anesthetic and surgical procedures entail some degree of risk, which we want you to be aware of. These risks include reactions to anesthetic drugs; heart, respiratory or blood pressure abnormalities; abnormal or slow recovery from the drugs used; and, in the worst cases, death under anesthesia. Surgical complications can include abnormal bleeding, infection, dehiscence (when the incision pulls apart), reaction to suture materials or damage to the incision from the pet licking, chewing or rubbing. Suture material can break or come loose. Pets occasionally chew off bandages or sutures – and occasionally swallow bandage material which could require additional surgery.

We will take all the precautions we can to avoid problems, and your decisions as far as ECG (heart) screening and extra testing for breed specific problems such as hemophilia will also help to make your pet’s procedure safer.

Canine spay/neuter, estimate/admit notes or handout:

After your pet is admitted to the hospital, an examination will be performed to ensure that he or she is healthy enough for surgery and to look for any problems we could address while he or she is here, such as an ear or skin infection. Pre-anesthetic testing is checked, as well as the patient record, to make sure we don’t miss any issues that would affect our anesthesia or fluid support, such as medication allergies or dehydration. An individual plan is made and documented for anesthesia and pain medication. Emergency drug dosages will be calculated in case they would be needed.

An intravenous (IV) catheter will be placed for fluid and medication delivery and anesthesia will be administered. Monitoring under anesthesia includes blood oxygen levels, heart rate, temperature and blood pressure. Low blood pressure and low temperature are common side effects of anesthesia, so we use warming devices to prevent hypothermia and extra fluids if needed for low blood pressure. The surgery site will be clipped and prepped for sterility and your dog will then moved into the surgery room, where the ovariohysterectomy or orchiectomy (spay or neuter) surgery is performed. Local anesthesia similar to lidocaine is used along the incision for greater comfort after waking up. (Human patients have less pain from their incisions even a week after surgery if a local anesthetic was used.)

After surgery your dog will be monitored during recovery and the IV fluid catheter is removed after he or she is fully awake and no longer would need any extra medication. We check his/her temperature and watch for vomiting, bleeding at the incision site, swelling or signs of pain.

We also call you up to let you know your pet is OK!

Canine spay discharge notes:

After your pet was admitted to the hospital, an examination was performed to ensure she was healthy enough for surgery and to look for any problems we could address while she was here, such as an ear or skin infection.

Pre-anesthetic testing was checked, as well as the patient record, to make sure we didn’t miss any issues, such as medication allergies or dehydration, that would affect our anesthesia or fluid support. An individual plan was made and documented for anesthesia and pain medication. Emergency drug dosages were calculated in case they would be needed.

An intravenous (IV) catheter was placed for fluid and medication delivery and anesthesia was administered. Monitoring under anesthesia included blood oxygen levels, heart rate, temperature and blood pressure. Low blood pressure and low temperature are common side effects of anesthesia, so we use warming devices to prevent hypothermia and extra fluids if needed for low blood pressure.

The surgery site was clipped and prepped for sterility and your dog was then moved into the surgery room, where the ovariohysterectomy or orchiectomy (spay or neuter) surgery was performed. Local anesthesia similar to lidocaine was used along the incision for greater comfort after waking up. (Human patients have less pain from their incisions even a week after surgery if a local anesthetic was used.)

After surgery she was monitored during recovery and the IV fluid catheter was removed after she was fully awake and no longer would need any extra medication. We checked his or her temperature and watched for vomiting, bleeding at the incision site, swelling or signs of pain.

We also called you up to let you know your pet was OK!

Feline spay/neuter, estimate/admit notes or handout:

After your pet is admitted to the hospital, an examination will be performed to ensure that he or she is healthy enough for surgery and to look for any problems we could address while he or she is here, such as an ear or skin infection.

Pre-anesthetic testing is checked, as well as the patient record, to make sure we don’t miss any issues that would affect our anesthesia or fluid support, such as medication allergies or dehydration. An individual plan is made and documented for anesthesia and pain medication. Emergency drug dosages will be calculated in case they would be needed.

An intravenous (IV) catheter will be placed for fluid and medication delivery for spays. The neuter procedure is short enough that we don’t need one but we usually give fluids subcutaneously instead. Anesthesia will be administered along with oxygen. Monitoring under anesthesia includes blood oxygen levels, heart rate, temperature and blood pressure. Low blood pressure and low temperature are common side effects of anesthesia, so we use warming devices to prevent hypothermia and extra fluids if needed for low blood pressure.

The surgery site will be clipped and prepped for sterility and your cat will then moved into the surgery room, where the ovariohysterectomy or orchiectomy (spay or neuter) surgery is performed. Local anesthesia similar to lidocaine is used along the incision for greater comfort after waking up. (Human patients have less pain from their incisions even a week after surgery if a local anesthetic was used.)

After surgery your cat will be monitored during recovery. For females, the IV fluid catheter is removed after she is fully awake and no longer would need any extra medication. We check his/her temperature and watch for vomiting, bleeding at the incision site, swelling or signs of pain.

We also call you up to let you know your pet is OK!

Feline spay/neuter discharge notes:

After your pet was admitted to the hospital, an examination was performed to ensure she was healthy enough for surgery and to look for any problems we could address while she was here, such as an ear or skin infection.

Pre-anesthetic testing was checked, as well as the patient record, to make sure we didn’t miss any issues, such as medication allergies or dehydration, that would affect our anesthesia or fluid support. An individual plan was made and documented for anesthesia and pain medication. Emergency drug dosages were calculated in case they would be needed.

An intravenous (IV) catheter was placed for fluid and medication delivery for spays. The neuter procedure is short enough that we don’t need one but we usually give fluids subcutaneously instead. Anesthesia was administered along with oxygen. Monitoring under anesthesia included blood oxygen levels, heart rate, temperature and blood pressure. Low blood pressure and low temperature are common side effects of anesthesia, so we use warming devices to prevent hypothermia and extra fluids if needed for low blood pressure.

The surgery site was clipped and prepped for sterility and your cat was then moved into the surgery room, where the ovariohysterectomy or orchiectomy (spay or neuter) surgery was performed. Local anesthesia similar to lidocaine was used along the incision for greater comfort after waking up. (Human patients have less pain from their incisions even a week after surgery if a local anesthetic was used.)

After surgery your cat was monitored during recovery. For females, the IV fluid catheter was removed after she was fully awake and no longer would need any extra medication. We checked his or her temperature and watched for vomiting, bleeding at the incision site, swelling or signs of pain.

We also called you up to let you know your pet was OK! 

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